New Transportation Regulations Lead to Continued Changes in Trucking Industry

The trucking industry is changing how its drivers record their hours for the first time in a long time with a newly implemented government rule announced by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, established to help truck drivers combat fatigue. In the past, truck drivers have been required to keep a paper log of their hours, but the new electronic logging device rule (ELD) is set to change everything.

The electronic logging device is designed to record the driver’s time on the road through monitoring miles driven, the movement of the vehicle, engine hours and the location of the driver more effectively.

Approximately three million commercial truck and bus drivers will be required to record their hours using the modern logging device, intended to also establish a safer environment over all for truck drivers.

The electronic logging device (ELD) will also allow companies in the trucking industry the opportunity to track their driver’s required mileage progression. Drivers feel that with this ability, companies will force their drivers to fulfill their mileage requirement even if they are too tired to drive.

The Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association doesn’t agree with the new rule, suing the Safety Administration in hopes of banning it. The association believes the rule is no more effective than recording hours manually and the cost of the new technology to the trucking industry is not worth its service.

According to the Safety Administration however, the electronic recording device is set to save an estimated net savings of $1 billion a year, specifically through paperwork reductions. The Safety Administration additionally estimates that it will save 26 lives and prevent 526 injuries annually.

The rule will go into effect in early 2016, but will give companies two years after the effective start date for them to begin implemented the device. A new transportation law will also go into effect, allowing some 18 to 20 year-olds to be able to drive trucking vehicles across state lines.

This controversial law has caused concerned for some, but arrives as many current truck drivers are gearing towards retirement. According to industry leaders, they say they will hire 890,000 drivers over the next ten years to replace those leaving. Due to also a shortage, truck driver’s salaries will also continue to increase.

With all the changes occurring in the trucking industry, we understand that the law can be difficult to navigate if you find yourself in a challenging spot. At Corso Law Group, we understand that the last thing a truck driver needs is a CDL ticket or a complication with the law. To schedule a free consultation with one our experienced Houston criminal defense attorneys, please call (713) 231-0499.

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