Traffic Ticket

The True Cost of a Speeding Ticket

Have you ever received a speeding ticket? Did you wonder where the money went after you paid the ticket? Most likely you and many others in Arizona contributed tens of millions to government programs through unnecessary citation costs.

Instead of local and state taxes contributing to government programs, Arizona legislation has shifted the burden to those who have committed a crime.

Over the last two decades, Arizona’s state-mandated surcharges went from 56 percent to 83 percent, according to the Arizona Republic.

When you pay the state $95 for a speeding ticket, you’ll also be required to pay for programs and flat fees that could raise the price to as much as $243.

Because of these surcharges you’ll be paying:

  • $95 for the ticket
  • $79 for state programs
  • $13 for police training
  • $2 for a victim’s rights fund
  • $7 court-restitution fund
  • $27 for court technology
  • $20 for the county probation department.

Penalizing drivers with additional costs and surcharges should not be practiced by the state of Arizona. Government-run programs should receive their funding from taxpayers, without drivers picking up the remainder of the tab.

Along with the financial consequences, there also can be a personal impact from a criminal speeding ticket. In Arizona, a criminal speeding ticket is a class 3 misdemeanor. If you’re found guilty, every time you’re asked if you have a criminal record, you’ll have to answer “yes”.

At Corso Law Group, we understand the consequences and the true costs of a speeding ticket. If you are charged with speeding, the lawyers at Corso Law Group will fight for you and obtain the best possible outcome.

Click for a free consultation or call (480) 471-4616.

Strict DUI Enforcement on Super Bowl Sunday May Lead to Increased Arrests on Phoenix Roads

Experienced Arizona DUI attorney Christopher Corso says Arizonans can expect zero leniency from police on Super Bowl Sunday this year – especially when it comes to drunk driving.

The Super Bowl is a big day for drinking, with an estimated 323.5 million gallons of beer consumed and 49.2 million cases sold on Super Bowl Sunday in the U.S.

The annual event brings with it plenty of parties and festivities, meaning saturation points and patrols will be out in full force to combat drunk driving accidents and DUIs, which can be up to twice as likely on Super Bowl Sunday than any other Sunday, The Los Angeles Times reports.

“Law enforcement knows the Super Bowl is one of the most dangerous days for drinking and driving, and they’re stepping up their presence by enforcing DUI laws and punishing violators to the highest degree,” Corso said. “Even if you’re under the legal limit, Arizona law states that you could still be apprehended.”

Arizona is the strictest state in the nation when it comes to DUI laws. It’s also a no-tolerance state, which means police can arrest anyone who they believe is showing signs of impairment, even if their blood alcohol content (BAC) is less than the legal limit of .08 percent.

For those who are arrested for DUI on Super Bowl Sunday, the consequences can be severe. Even a first-time DUI offense can mean up to 10 days in jail, a 90-day license suspension and the required installation of an ignition interlock device in Arizona.

Previous DUI offenses and high BACs could lead to even more intense penalties as multiple-offenses and extreme DUIs result in increased jail time, higher fines, counseling, community service and longer license suspensions.

“This isn’t a time to gamble with your freedom,” Corso said. “If’ you’re arrested for a possible DUI during Super Bowl weekend, having the experienced DUI attorneys at Corso Law Group onyour side can make a big difference.”

Corso Law Group has extensive experience with all types of Arizona DUIs, including misdemeanor and felony DUI charges.

“Our attorneys are well-versed in Arizona’s strict DUI laws, and we understand how challenging DUI defense,” Corso said. “We’re here to assist Arizonans who find themselves in a difficult legal situation on high-risk days, like Super Bowl Sunday, and on any other day of the year.”

Corso Law Group is an experienced team of legal professionals who have handled thousands of Arizona DUI cases. Founder Christopher Corso is a former Maricopa County prosecutor who can help with drunk driving cases as well as other criminal defense needs such as criminal speeding, CDL tickets, photo radar tickets, felony charges, drug possession, weapons possession, violent crimes and more.

Free consultations are available by visiting https://corsolawgroup.com or calling (480) 471-4616.

Corso Law Group, PLLC is located at 14500 N. Northsight Blvd., Suite 116 in Scottsdale, Arizona, 85260.

 

New Laws to Look Out for in 2016

Can’t pay your ticket? This year, Arizona is making it legal to work off what you owe with community service. This, and several other new laws to make note of are going into effect in 2016 in Arizona and around the country.

New Laws in Arizona 

Pay Your Ticket with Community Service

Senate Bill 1117 permits anyone who is unable or unwilling to pay the cost of court fees, fines, and tickets to work off what is owed by participating in community service. Each hour of community service pays for $10 of debt.

Expanded Protection Against Identity Theft

Arizona is one of the worst states for identity theft crimes, but expansions to existing laws are in place this year to help protect citizens by allowing people to place a credit freeze on themselves so that credit reports can’t be released without permission from the individual. This law is designed to prevent thieves from applying for credit cards or loans using someone else’s identity and credit history.

Vexatious Litigants Law Update

Judges can no longer waive court fees and costs for any person designated a “vexatious litigant,” or someone representing themselves, who files repeated court actions largely to harass others, unreasonably delay court proceedings or bring actions without “substantial justification.”

The only exception would be in family court cases involving divorce and child support.

Previously, judges could waive fees for those unable to afford the cost of filing a lawsuit so that financial standing couldn’t prevent someone from going to court.

New Laws Around the Nation

Minimum Wage Increases

Several states are increasing the minimum wage this year, including those known for a high cost of living like California, Hawaii and New York.

Fast-food workers in New York will receive the initial increase in pay now for an overall plan to bump minimum wage up to $15 by 2018 in New York City and by 2021 in the rest of the state.

Other states increasing minimum wage in 2016 include Connecticut, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Rhode Island, Vermont and West Virginia.

Gun Laws in Texas

Texas started off the New Year with a bang as new open carry laws went into effect on Jan. 1. Now, anyone who previously had a concealed carry license can openly carry a holstered handgun in designated areas.

Another new gun law coming to Texas in August will allow the carry of concealed handguns on university campuses.

Vaccinations Required in California

As a result of last year’s measles outbreak, which left 147 people in the U.S. sick, California will no longer accept personal and religious belief exemption waivers, requiring vaccinations for all children at public and private schools.