photo radar defense

Arizona Representative Aims to Change Photo Radar Requirements

Imagine getting a photo radar ticket for something you didn’t do. Arizona Rep. Bob Thorpe of Flagstaff is proposing a bill (HB 2366) that would do just that.

With this new bill, it would end the requirement for photo radar tickets to have a picture of the vehicle’s driver. The only thing the government would need is a picture of the license plate.

On its face, the bill’s main purpose is to put photo radar cameras on school buses. With a camera attached to a bus, Arizona law enforcement hopes it will be be able to catch drivers who don’t stop for school buses.

Under Arizona law, motorists must stop when a school bus has its flashing lights on and a stop sign extended. Anyone who violates this law must pay a $250 fine. If the violation occurs three times within a 36-month period, motorists can lose their license for at least six months.

If the bill is approved, however, the photo radar law will affect more than just school buses. Car owners will no longer be able to prove who was driving their vehicle. When a photo radar camera takes a picture of the license plate and not the driver, car owners will have two options; pay the ticket or provide the name of who was driving the vehicle.

Since it’s entirely plausible that a family member, friend or mechanic could drive someone else’s car from time to time, the threat of overreaching and unfair photo radar ticketing becomes a concern. If for some reason, the car exceeds the speed limit, the government won’t know who’s behind the wheel. The car owner will then receive the ticket and face the penalty unless they can provide another name.

As this new bill makes it way through the legislature, it’s clear it is more about making a profit than safety. Every year, photo radar companies and the government look to maximize their revenue from photo radar tickets.

As the process for prosecuting photo radar tickets continues to change, Corso Law Group is one of the few firms in Arizona that specializes in photo radar defense and understands how to fight them. Should you have questions about photo radar or any other moving violation, please contact us for a free consultation or call (480) 471-4616.

Controversial Arizona Photo Radar Cameras Back in the News

A new bill concerning the use of photo radar in Arizona has been introduced by state representatives. HB 2690 says that all authorities and agencies in Arizona using photo enforcement have to calibrate the camera systems at least once every 24 hours.

If a ticket produced from a photo enforcement system is distributed without the proper time stamp that meets the 24 hour calibration requirement, that ticket would be dismissed by the court.Photo radar in Arizona

Proponents of HB 2690, such as the sponsor of the bill, Rep. David Gowan, believe that this new bill would ensure that photo radar systems reach the same level of quality as hand held radar systems, which are tested everyday by police officers, and would also grant drivers fair treatment if they are ticketed by a photo radar system.

Previously, state legislators like Governor Jan Brewer have signed bills that aim to eliminate photo enforcement in Arizona, including a law from 2013 that only allows photo radar systems if state transportation officials confirm they’re necessary due to safety needs, the Associated Press and KPHO reports.

Criticism of the new bill focus on the confusion surrounding the term “calibrate” and how exactly it defines this piece of legislation.

In Tucson, photo enforcement systems have been in placement since 2009 by American Traffic Solutions and the systems are tested for accuracy through a computer once a day, according to KGUN 9.

Tucson police Commander Robert Shoun said in the East Valley Tribune that calibrate could mean anything, but if it means a specialist is required to visit each affected intersection and check on the camera devices personally at least once every 24 hours, that would be a large expense for towns and cities.

Update: Although HB 2690 passed out of the House Transportation Committee in February, on March 18, 2014, HB 2690 failed to pass the Senate Transportation Committee. For more details, you can review the bill’s history here.

Photo Radar Lawyers Corso Law Group Fight El Mirage Photo Radar Tickets

Scottsdale, Ariz. – The Arizona photo radar lawyers at Scottsdale’s Corso Law Group work tirelessly to fight El Mirage photo radar tickets.

Fighting El Mirage photo radar tickets is a specialty for Corso Law Group. The law firm is one of only a handful of firms that specializes in Arizona photo radar defense. The photo radar lawyers look for new ways to interpret the laws and arrive at solutions that make sense for their clients.

When it comes to fighting El Mirage photo radar tickets, the Arizona traffic lawyers at Corso Law Group say they’ve handled more than any other firm in the state.

“There are many ways to fight El Mirage photo radar tickets but it requires an experienced traffic lawyer,” said John M. Rhude, Esq., one of the firm’s founding partners. “We know the law and the rules. Hiring our firm gives you an advantage when fighting El Mirage photo radar tickets.”

The process for prosecuting photo radar tickets has changed over the years and continues to evolve every day. We stay on top of the legal arguments and help you receive the best possible outcome.

According to Rhude’s partner, Christopher P. Corso, Esq., there are many misconceptions about photo radar tickets in Arizona.

“The days of process servers approaching you and handing you a ticket are long gone,” Corso said. “Process servers can deliver the ticket to your door and leave it or the ticket can be sent directly through the mail. The reason is the state of Arizona considers both options an acceptable application of alternative service.”

Rhude agrees.

“When you receive your paperwork in the mail, the process has begun – the clock is ticking,” Rhude said. “To the courts, the United States Post Office is reliable delivery service and the address on your registration is reliable because you are required by law to keep it updated. The courts have your photo, they have your registration and they a picture of your license. Claiming that you haven’t been served is not a realistic option anymore.”

To see Corso Law Group’s track record with El Mirage photo radar tickets, please visit: http://crcriminallaw.com/arizona-photo-radar-defense/. It’s important to remember that results may vary depending on a client’s individual circumstances. Please contact Corso Law Group’s legal support team to discuss an El Mirage photo radar case or any Arizona photo radar case.

In addition to civil speeding and criminal speeding issues, Corso Law Group handles a myriad of criminal cases, including Arizona DUIs (the firm has handled more than 14,000 DUI cases), domestic violence defense, possession of drugs, felony drug charges, photo radar, disorderly conduct and marijuana possession.

The Arizona traffic lawyers at Corso Law Group do everything in their power to protect their defendant’s families and advocate for their rights. They have the experience and expertise to deal with traffic charges in Arizona and will fight to get the charges dismissed and preserve their family.

Corso Law Group has quickly built a reputation for its vigorous defense of clients, using its lawyers’ previous experience with the Maricopa County Attorney’s Office and other prosecutorial agencies to assist its clients with their criminal defense cases.

The experienced Arizona traffic lawyers at Corso Law Group serve clients throughout Arizona, including the cities of Ahwatukee, Avondale, Buckeye, Chandler, El Mirage, Gilbert, Glendale, Goodyear, Mesa, Peoria, Phoenix, Scottsdale, Sun City, Surprise, Tempe, Tolleson and Youngtown.

To schedule a free consultation, please visit www.corsolawgroup.com or call (480) 471-4616. Corso Law Group, PLLC is located at 14500 N. Northsight Blvd., Suite 116 in Scottsdale, Arizona, 85260.